Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Your Donation at Work: AHF Funds Laminitis Research on New Drugs for Insulin Dysregulation at Tufts


One of two 2016 AHF laminitis research grants for 2016 will be awarded to Nicholas Frank, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, Professor of Large Animal Internal Medicine at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, in Massachusetts. His proposal, "Safety and Efficacy of Two New Drugs for Managing Insulin Dysregulation in Horses" was chosen from among the studies submitted to AHF over the winter.

Dr. Frank's co-investigators include a postdoctoral associate, Sarah Cass, at Tufts and two associates at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst: Director of Equine Management Cassandra Uricchio and Professor Carlos Gradil.

Nick Frank of the Cummings
School of Veterinary Medicine,
Tufts University
The research team in Massachusetts plans to investigate two drugs that are used to treat endocrine disorders in humans are candidate therapies for managing insulin dysregulation (ID) in horses. These drugs have very different mechanisms of action: one lowers blood glucose concentrations by blocking the reabsorption of glucose in the kidney and the other inhibits insulin secretion from beta cells of the pancreas.

It is likely that one or both drugs will be developed into veterinary pharmaceuticals in the future, but this cannot be assumed and the approval process takes years to complete. There is an urgent need for new treatments for ID in horses.

Both medications are already available for use in humans and can be prescribed to horses as extra-label medications. Dr. Frank will evaluate these new drugs and obtain information to guide their potential use in horses and ponies.

What is insulin dysregulation?
Insulin dysregulation is the key component of equine metabolic syndrome (EMS), a collection of risk factors associated with the development of laminitis in horses and ponies. Equids with ID have higher than normal insulin concentrations when feeding (postprandial hyperinsulinemia) and laminitis is thought to develop when hyperinsulinemia occurs for extended periods of time in horses and ponies grazing on pasture.

Fasting hyperinsulinemia and tissue insulin resistance (IR) are also detected in animals with more advanced ID.

What is the benefit to laminitis research of this study?
It is our overall hypothesis that these medications can be used as single or combined therapies for managing postprandial hyperinsulinemia in horses and ponies, and that improved management of hyperinsulinemia will lower the risk of laminitis.

What are the goals of this study?
The specific aims of the study are:
1) To evaluate the safety and dosing of these two medications in horses.
2) To compare normal horses and horses with ID and assess the impact of the medications (each administered alone) on resting and postprandial insulin and glucose concentrations.
3) To determine whether one or both medications alter active glucagon-like peptide-1 (aGLP-1) concentrations during oral sugar tests in horses.
How will you conduct this study?
The study will be conducted by administering the medications to Morgan horses (three normal; three with ID) in dose escalation studies. This project will be conducted at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Congratulations to Dr. Frank and his team.

Photo of Dr. Frank courtesy of Richard Booth.

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